No, this gynecological procedure will not prevent you from having orgasms


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No, this gynecological procedure will not prevent you from having orgasms


Everything started from an article published on September 10 in the columns of the Cosmopolitan US: "This routine gynecological examination may prevent you from ever having an orgasm again". On the front of the scene, several testimonies of women who have lost all sensitivity after a "leep procedure", in French a conisation of the cervix, an operation which involves surgically removing part of the cervix. It is carried out in case of contamination of the human papillomavirus (HPV). We asked an expert to enlighten us.

What is a leep procedure?

Let's start from the beginning, what is a cervical conization? We told you right above it is a surgical operation that involves removing a portion of the cervix. It is performed after having made the following diagnosis: "the patient was infected with the human papillomavirus, often during her first sexual intercourse between the ages of 16 and 25. Ten years later, the infection has become chronic"explains Dr. Bertrand de Rochambeau, obstetrician gynecologist, and surgeon. His condition is precancerous. To avoid its evolution towards a cancer (which will develop, here also, on average ten years later), one thus proceeds to a conisation of the cervix.

The technical gesture, responsible?

"Concretely, we use a wire that has the same effect as a wire cut butter"says the doctor. "It will cut the tissues without altering them and remove the dysplasia". Without altering them, really? "Yes", says the professional. "Conization of the cervix does not have any impact on sexual sensitivity when it is well done." Moreover, he adds, "the withdrawn part is very little innervated (that is to say, it contains very few nerve endings)". So how to explain the testimony of these women, who would have lost all sensitivity and the ability to have orgasms after a "leep procedure"? For Dr. Bertrand de Rochambeau, two phenomena can explain it. First, the trauma of the announcement. "It's a question of treating the consequences of an STI, which can be a bad experience for the patient, who may lose confidence and feel guilty, which is why it is important to be aware of how it is announced and explain the diagnosis and treatment ". Secondo, "This may be a consequence of complications during the operation, which remains very rare, according to him". And to study on a case by case basis. To be continued.

Read also :

⋙ Cervical cancer: 5 misconceptions about the HPV vaccine

⋙ Cervical cancer: What is the most effective test for HPV?

⋙ Papillomavirus: a country could successfully eradicate cervical cancer within 2 years


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